Month: October 2017

THE CHATBOT MONETIZATION REPORT: Sizing the market, key strategies, and how to navigate the chatbot opportunity (FB, AAPL, GOOG)

bii chatbots_users

This is a preview of a research report from BI Intelligence, Business Insider’s premium research service. To learn more about BI Intelligence, click here.

Improving artificial intelligence (AI) technology and the proliferation of messaging apps — which enable users and businesses to interact through a variety of mediums, including text, voice, image, video, and file sharing — are fueling the popularity of chatbots.

These software programs use messaging as an interface through which to carry out various tasks, like checking the weather or scheduling a meeting. Bots are still nascent and monetization models have yet to be established for the tech, but there are a number of existing strategies — like “as-a-service” or affiliate marketing — that will likely prove successful for bots used as a tool within messaging apps.

Chatbots can also provide brands with value adds — services that don’t directly generate revenue, but help increase the ability of brands and businesses to better target and serve customers, and increase productivity. These include bots used for research, lead generation, and customer service.

A new report from BI Intelligence investigates how brands can monetize their chatbots by tailoring existing models. It also explores various ways chatbots can be used to cut businesses’ operational costs. And finally, it highlights the slew of barriers that brands need to overcome in order to tap into the potentially lucrative market. 

Here are some of the key takeaways: Screen Shot 2016 11 22 at 5.26.40 pm

  • Chatbot adoption has already taken off in the US with more than half of US users between the ages of 18 and 55 having used them, according to exclusive BI Intelligence survey data.
  • Chatbots boast a number of distinct features that make them a perfect vehicle for brands to reach consumers. These include a global presence, high retention rates, and an ability to appeal to a younger demographic.
  • Businesses and brands are looking to capitalize on the potential to monetize the software. BI Intelligence identifies four existing models that can be successfully tailored for chatbots. These models include Bots-as-a-Service, native content, affiliate marketing, and retail sales.
  • Chatbots can also provide brands with value adds, or services that don’t directly generate revenue. Bots used for research, lead generation, and customer service can cut down on companies’ operational costs.
  • There are several benchmarks chatbots must reach, and barriers they must overcome, before becoming successful revenue generators. 

In full, the report:

  • Explains the different ways businesses can access, utilize, and distribute content via chatbots.
  • Breaks down the pros and cons of each chatbot monetization model.
  • Identifies the additional value chatbots can provide businesses outside of direct monetization.
  • Looks at the potential barriers that could limit the growth, adoption, and use of chatbots and therefore their earning potential.

Interested in getting the full report? Here are several ways to access it:

  1. Subscribe to an All-Access pass to BI Intelligence and gain immediate access to this report and over 100 other expertly researched reports. As an added bonus, you’ll also gain access to all future reports and daily newsletters to ensure you stay ahead of the curve and benefit personally and professionally. >> Learn More Now
  2. Purchase & download the full report from our research store. >> Purchase & Download Now

Join the conversation about this story »

NOW WATCH: This ‘crazy, irrational decision’ Apple made 20 years ago turned out to be the key to its outrageous success over Samsung

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THE CHATBOT MONETIZATION REPORT: Sizing the market, key strategies, and how to navigate the chatbot opportunity (FB, AAPL, GOOG)

bii chatbots_users

This is a preview of a research report from BI Intelligence, Business Insider’s premium research service. To learn more about BI Intelligence, click here.

Improving artificial intelligence (AI) technology and the proliferation of messaging apps — which enable users and businesses to interact through a variety of mediums, including text, voice, image, video, and file sharing — are fueling the popularity of chatbots.

These software programs use messaging as an interface through which to carry out various tasks, like checking the weather or scheduling a meeting. Bots are still nascent and monetization models have yet to be established for the tech, but there are a number of existing strategies — like “as-a-service” or affiliate marketing — that will likely prove successful for bots used as a tool within messaging apps.

Chatbots can also provide brands with value adds — services that don’t directly generate revenue, but help increase the ability of brands and businesses to better target and serve customers, and increase productivity. These include bots used for research, lead generation, and customer service.

A new report from BI Intelligence investigates how brands can monetize their chatbots by tailoring existing models. It also explores various ways chatbots can be used to cut businesses’ operational costs. And finally, it highlights the slew of barriers that brands need to overcome in order to tap into the potentially lucrative market. 

Here are some of the key takeaways: Screen Shot 2016 11 22 at 5.26.40 pm

  • Chatbot adoption has already taken off in the US with more than half of US users between the ages of 18 and 55 having used them, according to exclusive BI Intelligence survey data.
  • Chatbots boast a number of distinct features that make them a perfect vehicle for brands to reach consumers. These include a global presence, high retention rates, and an ability to appeal to a younger demographic.
  • Businesses and brands are looking to capitalize on the potential to monetize the software. BI Intelligence identifies four existing models that can be successfully tailored for chatbots. These models include Bots-as-a-Service, native content, affiliate marketing, and retail sales.
  • Chatbots can also provide brands with value adds, or services that don’t directly generate revenue. Bots used for research, lead generation, and customer service can cut down on companies’ operational costs.
  • There are several benchmarks chatbots must reach, and barriers they must overcome, before becoming successful revenue generators. 

In full, the report:

  • Explains the different ways businesses can access, utilize, and distribute content via chatbots.
  • Breaks down the pros and cons of each chatbot monetization model.
  • Identifies the additional value chatbots can provide businesses outside of direct monetization.
  • Looks at the potential barriers that could limit the growth, adoption, and use of chatbots and therefore their earning potential.

Interested in getting the full report? Here are several ways to access it:

  1. Subscribe to an All-Access pass to BI Intelligence and gain immediate access to this report and over 100 other expertly researched reports. As an added bonus, you’ll also gain access to all future reports and daily newsletters to ensure you stay ahead of the curve and benefit personally and professionally. >> Learn More Now
  2. Purchase & download the full report from our research store. >> Purchase & Download Now

Join the conversation about this story »

NOW WATCH: This ‘crazy, irrational decision’ Apple made 20 years ago turned out to be the key to its outrageous success over Samsung

THE CHATBOT MONETIZATION REPORT: Sizing the market, key strategies, and how to navigate the chatbot opportunity (FB, AAPL, GOOG)

bii chatbots_users

This is a preview of a research report from BI Intelligence, Business Insider’s premium research service. To learn more about BI Intelligence, click here.

Improving artificial intelligence (AI) technology and the proliferation of messaging apps — which enable users and businesses to interact through a variety of mediums, including text, voice, image, video, and file sharing — are fueling the popularity of chatbots.

These software programs use messaging as an interface through which to carry out various tasks, like checking the weather or scheduling a meeting. Bots are still nascent and monetization models have yet to be established for the tech, but there are a number of existing strategies — like “as-a-service” or affiliate marketing — that will likely prove successful for bots used as a tool within messaging apps.

Chatbots can also provide brands with value adds — services that don’t directly generate revenue, but help increase the ability of brands and businesses to better target and serve customers, and increase productivity. These include bots used for research, lead generation, and customer service.

A new report from BI Intelligence investigates how brands can monetize their chatbots by tailoring existing models. It also explores various ways chatbots can be used to cut businesses’ operational costs. And finally, it highlights the slew of barriers that brands need to overcome in order to tap into the potentially lucrative market. 

Here are some of the key takeaways: Screen Shot 2016 11 22 at 5.26.40 pm

  • Chatbot adoption has already taken off in the US with more than half of US users between the ages of 18 and 55 having used them, according to exclusive BI Intelligence survey data.
  • Chatbots boast a number of distinct features that make them a perfect vehicle for brands to reach consumers. These include a global presence, high retention rates, and an ability to appeal to a younger demographic.
  • Businesses and brands are looking to capitalize on the potential to monetize the software. BI Intelligence identifies four existing models that can be successfully tailored for chatbots. These models include Bots-as-a-Service, native content, affiliate marketing, and retail sales.
  • Chatbots can also provide brands with value adds, or services that don’t directly generate revenue. Bots used for research, lead generation, and customer service can cut down on companies’ operational costs.
  • There are several benchmarks chatbots must reach, and barriers they must overcome, before becoming successful revenue generators. 

In full, the report:

  • Explains the different ways businesses can access, utilize, and distribute content via chatbots.
  • Breaks down the pros and cons of each chatbot monetization model.
  • Identifies the additional value chatbots can provide businesses outside of direct monetization.
  • Looks at the potential barriers that could limit the growth, adoption, and use of chatbots and therefore their earning potential.

Interested in getting the full report? Here are several ways to access it:

  1. Subscribe to an All-Access pass to BI Intelligence and gain immediate access to this report and over 100 other expertly researched reports. As an added bonus, you’ll also gain access to all future reports and daily newsletters to ensure you stay ahead of the curve and benefit personally and professionally. >> Learn More Now
  2. Purchase & download the full report from our research store. >> Purchase & Download Now

Join the conversation about this story »

NOW WATCH: This ‘crazy, irrational decision’ Apple made 20 years ago turned out to be the key to its outrageous success over Samsung

THE CHATBOT MONETIZATION REPORT: Sizing the market, key strategies, and how to navigate the chatbot opportunity (FB, AAPL, GOOG)

bii chatbots_users

This is a preview of a research report from BI Intelligence, Business Insider’s premium research service. To learn more about BI Intelligence, click here.

Improving artificial intelligence (AI) technology and the proliferation of messaging apps — which enable users and businesses to interact through a variety of mediums, including text, voice, image, video, and file sharing — are fueling the popularity of chatbots.

These software programs use messaging as an interface through which to carry out various tasks, like checking the weather or scheduling a meeting. Bots are still nascent and monetization models have yet to be established for the tech, but there are a number of existing strategies — like “as-a-service” or affiliate marketing — that will likely prove successful for bots used as a tool within messaging apps.

Chatbots can also provide brands with value adds — services that don’t directly generate revenue, but help increase the ability of brands and businesses to better target and serve customers, and increase productivity. These include bots used for research, lead generation, and customer service.

A new report from BI Intelligence investigates how brands can monetize their chatbots by tailoring existing models. It also explores various ways chatbots can be used to cut businesses’ operational costs. And finally, it highlights the slew of barriers that brands need to overcome in order to tap into the potentially lucrative market. 

Here are some of the key takeaways: Screen Shot 2016 11 22 at 5.26.40 pm

  • Chatbot adoption has already taken off in the US with more than half of US users between the ages of 18 and 55 having used them, according to exclusive BI Intelligence survey data.
  • Chatbots boast a number of distinct features that make them a perfect vehicle for brands to reach consumers. These include a global presence, high retention rates, and an ability to appeal to a younger demographic.
  • Businesses and brands are looking to capitalize on the potential to monetize the software. BI Intelligence identifies four existing models that can be successfully tailored for chatbots. These models include Bots-as-a-Service, native content, affiliate marketing, and retail sales.
  • Chatbots can also provide brands with value adds, or services that don’t directly generate revenue. Bots used for research, lead generation, and customer service can cut down on companies’ operational costs.
  • There are several benchmarks chatbots must reach, and barriers they must overcome, before becoming successful revenue generators. 

In full, the report:

  • Explains the different ways businesses can access, utilize, and distribute content via chatbots.
  • Breaks down the pros and cons of each chatbot monetization model.
  • Identifies the additional value chatbots can provide businesses outside of direct monetization.
  • Looks at the potential barriers that could limit the growth, adoption, and use of chatbots and therefore their earning potential.

Interested in getting the full report? Here are several ways to access it:

  1. Subscribe to an All-Access pass to BI Intelligence and gain immediate access to this report and over 100 other expertly researched reports. As an added bonus, you’ll also gain access to all future reports and daily newsletters to ensure you stay ahead of the curve and benefit personally and professionally. >> Learn More Now
  2. Purchase & download the full report from our research store. >> Purchase & Download Now

Join the conversation about this story »

NOW WATCH: This ‘crazy, irrational decision’ Apple made 20 years ago turned out to be the key to its outrageous success over Samsung

THE CHATBOT MONETIZATION REPORT: Sizing the market, key strategies, and how to navigate the chatbot opportunity (FB, AAPL, GOOG)

bii chatbots_users

This is a preview of a research report from BI Intelligence, Business Insider’s premium research service. To learn more about BI Intelligence, click here.

Improving artificial intelligence (AI) technology and the proliferation of messaging apps — which enable users and businesses to interact through a variety of mediums, including text, voice, image, video, and file sharing — are fueling the popularity of chatbots.

These software programs use messaging as an interface through which to carry out various tasks, like checking the weather or scheduling a meeting. Bots are still nascent and monetization models have yet to be established for the tech, but there are a number of existing strategies — like “as-a-service” or affiliate marketing — that will likely prove successful for bots used as a tool within messaging apps.

Chatbots can also provide brands with value adds — services that don’t directly generate revenue, but help increase the ability of brands and businesses to better target and serve customers, and increase productivity. These include bots used for research, lead generation, and customer service.

A new report from BI Intelligence investigates how brands can monetize their chatbots by tailoring existing models. It also explores various ways chatbots can be used to cut businesses’ operational costs. And finally, it highlights the slew of barriers that brands need to overcome in order to tap into the potentially lucrative market. 

Here are some of the key takeaways: Screen Shot 2016 11 22 at 5.26.40 pm

  • Chatbot adoption has already taken off in the US with more than half of US users between the ages of 18 and 55 having used them, according to exclusive BI Intelligence survey data.
  • Chatbots boast a number of distinct features that make them a perfect vehicle for brands to reach consumers. These include a global presence, high retention rates, and an ability to appeal to a younger demographic.
  • Businesses and brands are looking to capitalize on the potential to monetize the software. BI Intelligence identifies four existing models that can be successfully tailored for chatbots. These models include Bots-as-a-Service, native content, affiliate marketing, and retail sales.
  • Chatbots can also provide brands with value adds, or services that don’t directly generate revenue. Bots used for research, lead generation, and customer service can cut down on companies’ operational costs.
  • There are several benchmarks chatbots must reach, and barriers they must overcome, before becoming successful revenue generators. 

In full, the report:

  • Explains the different ways businesses can access, utilize, and distribute content via chatbots.
  • Breaks down the pros and cons of each chatbot monetization model.
  • Identifies the additional value chatbots can provide businesses outside of direct monetization.
  • Looks at the potential barriers that could limit the growth, adoption, and use of chatbots and therefore their earning potential.

Interested in getting the full report? Here are several ways to access it:

  1. Subscribe to an All-Access pass to BI Intelligence and gain immediate access to this report and over 100 other expertly researched reports. As an added bonus, you’ll also gain access to all future reports and daily newsletters to ensure you stay ahead of the curve and benefit personally and professionally. >> Learn More Now
  2. Purchase & download the full report from our research store. >> Purchase & Download Now

Join the conversation about this story »

NOW WATCH: This ‘crazy, irrational decision’ Apple made 20 years ago turned out to be the key to its outrageous success over Samsung

THE INSURANCE AND THE IoT REPORT: How insurers are using connected devices to cut costs and more accurately price policies

healthinsurerswearables

This is a preview of a research report from BI Intelligence, Business Insider’s premium research service. To learn more about BI Intelligence, click here.

Insurance companies have long based their pricing models and strategies on assumptions about the demographics of their customers. Auto insurers, for example, have traditionally charged higher premiums for parents of teenage drivers based on the assumption that members of this demographic are more likely to get into an accident.

But those assumptions are inherently flawed, since they often aren’t based on the actual behaviors and characteristics of individual customers. As new IoT technologies increasingly move into the mainstream, insurers are able to collect and analyze data to more accurately price premiums, helping them to protect the assets they insure and enabling more efficient assessment of damages to conserve resources.

A new report from BI Intelligence explains how companies in the auto, health, and home insurance markets are using the data produced by IoT solutions to augment their existing policy pricing models and grow their customer bases. In addition, it examines areas where IoT devices have the potential to open up new insurance segments.

 Here are some of the key takeaways:

  • The world’s largest auto insurers now offer usage-based policies, which price premiums based on vehicle usage data collected directly from the car.
  • Large home and commercial property insurers are using drones to inspect damaged properties, which can improve workflow efficiency and reduce their reliance on human labor.
  • Health and life insurance firms are offering customers fitness trackers to encourage healthy behavior, and discounts for meeting certain goals.
  • Home insurers are offering discounts on smart home devices to current customers, and in some cases, free devices to entice new customers.

In full, the report:

  • Forecasts the number of Americans who will have tried usage-based auto insurance by 2021.
  • Explains why narrowly tailored wearables could be what’s next for the health insurance industry.
  • Analyzes the market for potential future insurance products on IoT devices.
  • Discusses and analyzes the barriers to consumers opting in to policies that collect their data.

To get your copy of this invaluable guide to the IoT, choose one of these options:

  1. Subscribe to an ALL-ACCESS Membership with BI Intelligence and gain immediate access to this report AND over 100 other expertly researched deep-dive reports, subscriptions to all of our daily newsletters, and much more. >> START A MEMBERSHIP
  2. Purchase the report and download it immediately from our research store. >> BUY THE REPORT

The choice is yours. But however you decide to acquire this report, you’ve given yourself a powerful advantage in your understanding of insurance and the IoT.

Join the conversation about this story »

With the iPhone X, Apple made some big changes to who gets review units first, and not everyone is taking it very well (AAPL)

iPhone X

  • With the new iPhone X, Apple made big changes to its list of reviewers to whom it provides test devices. 
  • Apple ruffled some feathers by giving test phones to some video bloggers instead of some longtime tech reviewers.
  • The changes reflect Apple’s broader evolution from a niche tech company to a mainstream brand. 

 

Apple’s new iPhone X doesn’t hit store shelves until Friday, but squabbles about who gets the hotly-anticipated device first are already breaking out.

But the quarrels aren’t being triggered by consumers battling for the best spot in lines outside Apple’s stores. Instead the noisy discontent is coming from among the select group of journalists, bloggers and product reviewers who’ve long been accustomed to getting early access to the newest iPhones. 

Some, it seems, are not taking well to Apple’s surprise changes to its list of reviewers to whom it doles out its first test devices and to the amount of time it lets reviewers play with the device before they can publish their impressions.

In a series of venom-filled posts on Monday, for example, Apple blogger John Gruber lashed out at some of the media outlets he apparently deemed unworthy of getting early access to the new iPhone. 

iPhone X“Thank god Apple seeded Mike Allen with an iPhone X review unit. Such great insight from his fucking nephew, the emoji expert,” Gruber wrote sarcastically, referring to a piece in which the Axios executive editor delegated some of his product review to his 19-year-old nephew.

“Thank god Apple seeded Fashion with a review unit,” Gruber railed on, referring to a YouTube video blogger who also numbered among the first to receive an iPhone X test device. While Gruber got a review unit as well, he was one of the bloggers that were given less time than usual to test the device before he could publish his review.

No one likes to be second fiddle

Gruber, along with many other outlets including Business Insider, had less than 24 hours to play with the iPhone X before Apple’s restrictions on publishing reviews lifted Tuesday morning. By contrast, Apple allowed Allen, Wired’s Stephen Levy, and several YouTube bloggers, to publish their reviews on Monday after having their test devices for about a week.  

Gruber’s reaction was by far the angriest, and it elicited a flurry of responses:

//platform.twitter.com/widgets.js

 

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 But Gruber was not the only tech pundit to question Apple’s approach to iPhone X reviews:

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David Pogue, another member of the product review “old guard,” was more diplomatic, but even his piece included a hint of pique. Pogue highlighted October 31 as one of four “dates to keep in mind” with regard to the iPhone X timeline. Why? Because that’s when most of “the professional reviews appear,” Pogue wrote.

Meanwhile, Brian Chen at the New York Times insisted he would not play along with Apple’s new rules:

//platform.twitter.com/widgets.js

The writing has been on the wall

The hubbub may seem like the kind of parochial, media tempest in a teacup that only journalists care about. But it’s points to a bigger change that has defined the Apple story over the past decade or more.

Just a few days before the first iPhone was unveiled in 2007, Apple still officially called itself Apple Computer. It was a small niche player in the computer and consumer electronics industry. 

Since then, the company has evolved remarkably. It’s become the most valuable company in the world with major influence far beyond the tech industry. And it’s become as much a mass-market lifestyle brand as a computer vendor. Indeed, Apple is arguably now more of a luxury company than a tech company, with buyers of the iPhoneX just as likely to buy a Louis Vuitton product instead, noted an analyst at HSBC Holdings on Tuesday.

As Apple has evolved, its marketing has had to change too, to reach new audiences and customers far beyond its tech fan base. And that’s meant shedding, or at least de-emphasizing, some of its old ways and old friends as dispassionately as it dropped the word “computer” from its name.

SEE ALSO: I’ve been using the iPhone X for 18 hours, and I’m already sold

Join the conversation about this story »

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